As this pandemic began to take hold in the U.S., I was the one arguing “there is no way they will shut down all of California, it just isn’t practical!”  Nearly four months later, I stand corrected (with a mightily bruised ego).  With July 4th in our sights, COVID is accelerating across the country and

Governor Newsom announced today that California has moved on to early Stage 2, but only for cities and counties that obtain state approval.

Under Stage 2, certain businesses, establishments or activities may qualify to reopen including:

  • Dine-in restaurants
  • Limited services
  • Outdoor museums
  • Shopping centers & all in-store retail
  • All office-based workplaces
  • All manufacturing industries

Governor Gavin Newsom issued an executive order on May 6, 2020 that creates a rebuttable presumption that employees working outside the home who contract COVID-19 became infected at work. They would therefore be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits.

Here’s how the presumption works. An employee will be presumed to have contracted the virus at work

It shouldn’t surprise anyone that a massive component of California’s economy is and has been agriculture and food service, including farming, canning, processing, and of course, restaurants.  Given the size and scope of these industries in and across California, on April 16, 2020, Governor Newsom signed Executive Order N-51-20, expanding employee protections for Food

The White House has issued new guidelines for employers preparing to reopen their workplaces.  While there is no date certain for businesses to reopen, employers can use these guidelines to develop new processes and procedures for ensuring worker safety and a smooth operational transition. Governor Newsom or local officials may develop additional or more restrictive