Every year I look forward to attending and presenting at the Cornell HR in Hospitality Conference.  It is a great time to connect with clients, contacts, and to learn from the best and brightest in the hospitality industry.

Group of people discussing human resources around a tableThe three big themes this year seemed to be:  (1) #metoo and the many repercussions thereof; (2) the struggle to get the best talent in an era of low unemployment; and (3) the uncertainty of immigration laws and how to best protect valued employees and still comply with the changing legal landscape.

On the issue of #metoo (an issue we have blogged about many times over), my takeaways were:

  • Implement a “safe word” for colleagues to use with each other if someone is making them uncomfortable for any reason, without having to go to HR; I note my millennial niece often simply announces “uncomfortable.”
  • It is important for leaders (especially male leaders) to really listen to women and how these issues have impacted them, and not simply “mansplain” (and if you don’t know what that means you are likely doing it).

On the issue of recruiting the best talent, there was lots of talk about how to define the company culture in a way that attracts desired recruits.  One panel discussed performance assessments and how they are too long and complicated, and often do not mirror the company’s cultural values.  Some ideas there were:

  • Simplify and shorten
  • Provide reviews quarterly instead of annually
  • Ask fun questions:  What is your superpower and why?
  • Make them forward looking
  • Embrace anonymous 360 reviews, up and down the scale, so candid feedback can be provided

And finally, on the issue of immigration, on the one hand there is compassion for employees.  One panelist told a story about an employee who needed time off because her mother was deported and at 20 years old (and a citizen), she was suddenly responsible for the care of her 6 year old sister.

On the other hand, employers also have to deal with AB 450 (the California Immigration Worker Protection Act), which prohibits CA employers from granting access to immigration officials at a place of labor without a judicial warrant.  As of last week, this law is being challenged under federal law.  In addition, there is increased Federal I9 enforcement, so employers with concerns in that area should be proactive in reviewing those I9s.  Bottomline, it is time to have immigration counsel on speed dial, or subscribe to our firm’s blog on that subject.

All in all, a great conference.  Hope to see you there next year (March 25-27, 2019 at the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas)!


Illustration of a fox with sunglassesWe often blog about how different California employment laws are when compared to the rest of the US.  Whether it is the minimum wage, mandatory harassment prevention training requirements, or that funky law called PAGA, find out how to comply with laws in what we fondly refer to as the United Republic of California with this handy guide to Doing Business in California.

Many thanks to Sahara Pynes for her assistance in updating this informative guide.  Check it out on the Fox Rothschild website.

The California state flag

One issue that consistently trips up employers is the interplay of laws for an employee with work-related medical issues.  This is sometimes referred to as the Bermuda Triangle of workers’ compensation, ADA/FEHA (disability), and FMLA/CFRA. 

Quite often an employee is injured, a workers’ compensation claim is opened, and the employer somehow forgets the other two prongs of the triangle.  For example, the time off is not designated as FMLA/CFRA, with the rights that go along with it.  Or the duty to engage in the interactive process and reasonably accommodate under the ADA/FEHA is somehow forgotten when the employee returns to work with restrictions.

The reality is that many legal issues start with a workers’ compensation injury, and if those claims are handled proactively, then related civil claims arising from disability can be avoided. 

 Here are some tips for handling those workers’ compensation claims:

  1. First, be proactive when the claim comes in.  Investigate what happened.  Make sure witnesses provide statements with sufficient detail.  Preserve security film and video.  Document the extent of injuries (or the lack thereof).
  2. Second, get all of that information to your workers’ compensation carrier promptly so they can properly evaluate the claim.  If the carrier isn’t responsive, follow-up. 
  3. Third, if you have a light duty program, make sure it is only for a limited time (such as 90 days).  Otherwise you risk creating a new job for someone, and no incentive to get better.
  4. And finally, don’t forget about the interactive process.  If the claim is going to end with a Compromise & Release in the workers’ compensation case, then ask your carrier to negotiate for a resignation.  And if the employee comes back to work and is not fully recovered, make sure any restrictions are documented and accommodated. 

And of course, make sure the employee is not retaliated against for filing the claim. 

Be sure to remember all three sides to any work-related injury so you can avoid getting lost in the Bermuda Triangle!

29612338 – i survived the bermuda triangle grunge rubber stamp on white, vector illustration


More than ever before, the topic of sexual harassment is dominating the news (and this blog).  It’s time to make sure that your company’s sexual harassment prevention training is up to the task.

Fox Rothschild’s skilled team of attorney trainers will tailor a program to meet your company’s needs.  Take a break from the online routine, and make sure that your next sexual harassment prevention training session is a “wow,” not just a check-the-box compliance item.

38610418 – wow! comic speech bubble, cartoon

To learn more, check out this alert featuring our Los Angeles team.

In recent years, California and federal agencies have highly scrutinized independent contractor status.  While that scrutiny may be abating somewhat on the federal level, it is still alive and well in our golden state.  In fact, the issue has been popping up quite a bit lately in the context of audits by the Employment Development Department (EDD).

Copyright conceptOne issue that trips up many employers involves a standard provision many companies include in their independent contractor agreements to protect their intellectual property rights.  The standard language involves a statement that any work product developed by the contractor is deemed a “work made for hire“ under the meaning of the US Copyright Act, and is therefore owned exclusively by the company.  In lay terms that means that the company retains the intellectual property rights to works developed under contract.

Unfortunately, under California Unemployment Insurance Code Section 686, that language also means that the contractor is presumed to be an employee.  Yes, that’s right.  Even if the contractor meets none of the common law factors of an employee (i.e. works independently, the company doesn’t control how they do the work, they are paid by project, etc.), and wants or even requests to be a contractor, California’s EDD requires that the contractor be deemed an employee for purposes of unemployment and state disability taxes.

When and if the company is audited, the EDD will ask for copies of all independent contractor agreements, and if those four words are in there, “work made for hire,” the EDD will find the contractor (or group of contractors) should be taxed as employees.  That translates into back taxes, penalties and interest, as well as the potential of a pretty unhelpful precedent for related legal claims.

There is a possible work-around for this language — to use very specific assignment language instead; although this could have serious copyright implications under the “termination of transfer” provisions of the Copyright Act, so please consult a copyright lawyer before going forward with such a work-around.  Companies can also be proactive and remind departing contractors that they are not entitled to unemployment, which might dissuade a contractor from inadvertently triggering an audit.

For companies that rely on independent contractors, including consulting and entertainment businesses, it is especially important to review your contractor agreements for those four “work made for hire” words.  Oh, and if you use independent contractors and don’t have a signed contractor agreement on file, well you have much more risk than just an EDD audit on this one four-word technicality!


What a year it has been for harassment claims. The biggest year in the 22 years I have been practicing law. It seems that every day there is a big new headline or rejuvenated social media campaign, and someone else powerful losing their job over harassment allegations.

It is astounding to me that there are so many issues, even after AB 1825 was passed back in 2004 mandating harassment prevention training in California. That statute was expanded to require training on bullying and abusive conduct in 2015 (AB 2053). And now, as of January 1, 2018, it will need to include training on gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation (SB 396).  With increased protections for transgender employees under California law, training to increase tolerance and understanding surrounding those issues will be particularly important.

Training certainly hasn’t fixed the harassment issue. But since training is mandatory for any business with over 50 employees, it might as well be meaningful. That is why I try to focus my training on real life stories and anecdotes that get people out of their own head (and point of view), and into the head of the victim. One of the main themes is always that harassment is based on perception, not intent; so it is possible to unintentionally harass someone, in fact it happens all of the time. For example, someone may think a compliment, sexual innuendo, or even a direct pass is flattery, but as the millions of “me too” posts reflect, that may not be how such conduct is perceived by the recipient.  Especially when there is a power differential at play.

David Schwimmer’s series of #that’sharassment videos provide realistic (and disturbing) examples of how harassment resonates in workplaces, and how it feels to the recipient.

In my career I have seen many talented and valuable managers lose their jobs due to inappropriate behavior that violated harassment policies. In my training, I tell all managers that doing a great job is not a defense to a harassment claim, and won’t protect them. That message certainly rings true based on recent headlines.

Illustration of a pot boiling overCalifornia employers can expect all of the news about harassment claims to keep bringing even more issues to the surface. The proverbial pot has been stirred.

And as current events have shown, taking prompt action to correct and prevent harassment is critical. There have been enough headlines about harassment in 2017, don’t let the next one be about your company.  Let’s put an end to the me too’s.

There are few things I love more in life other than dogs and beer. So when I saw this article I was delighted! A beer company, called BrewDog, has decided to pay its employees a week of new puppy leave dubbed “pawternity” or “mutternity” leave when an employee gets a new puppy or adopts a dog.

29893089 – dog drinking beer tosa inu cute puppy lying on the grass and drinking beer

In my adult life I have raised three puppies, and each time I took “puppyernity leave” for the first week the puppy was home. Many clients, colleagues, and even opposing counsel were super supportive (and requested pictures). For those who love pets, especially puppies, they understand how hard that first week can be, and how little sleep you get.  Raising a puppy (or adopting a dog) is a tremendously joyous time, but it is also a big time commitment!

On a related issue, many clients have asked me if the various paid sick leave statutes coming up in cities all over the country allow time off for sick pets. My answer has been “not yet.” Unless, of course, you live in the city of Emeryville, and need sick time to care for a guide dog, signal dog, or service dog.

So let’s give a shout out to San Francisco, the most liberal city in the US. Come on now. Get on the puppy train. Let’s get some puppy leave ordinance drafted and expand sick leave to include pets. Oh, and while you are at it, make it mandatory to allow pets into all work spaces! Ok, maybe that one can wait. But are you really going to let a beer company based in Glasgow do more for employees (and their canine babies) than a business in San Francisco?

39224362 – web content accessibility concept with wheelchair icon and symbol on a blue computer key for blog and online business.

The claim du jour is website accessibility.

Plaintiffs are suing businesses in alarming numbers alleging that websites are not accessible to persons with disabilities.  In this alert, Fox attorneys Carolyn Richmond, Ernest Badway and Jason Jendrewski offer practical guidance for avoiding a lawsuit.

In addition to explaining the legal issues, this article includes a comprehensive checklist to evaluate the accessibility of a website and its content.  It also includes helpful action items for conforming with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0.

Get up to speed on this new legal issue here!

All of this news about hurricanes and the tragic images of people losing their homes (and everything in them), takes me back to advice my father gave me years ago, which was:  You need insurance for things you can’t afford to replace.

The same is true for businesses.  They need insurance for losses they can’t afford to sustain.  Yet, employers often don’t spend enough time thinking about insurance, until of course they need it, and are disappointed with the scope of protections provided.

I often see this with clients with regard to EPLI (Employment Practices Liability Insurance).  Some employers think they have it, but get sued by a former employee and find out they don’t have coverage.  But even those who have EPLI are not strategic enough about the scope of coverage they need.  Which brings me to my list of considerations:

  • Deductibles: How much of a deductible can you afford?  And what incentive does that provide in litigation? EPLI deductibles often range between $25,000 and $250,000.  A $25,000 deductible means that the business can afford a lot of litigation (if it wants to make a point of fighting to deter other claims).  A $150,000 or higher deductible may just cover larger losses, and motivate early settlements to save on the deductible.  A $75,000 deductible can be a reasonable middle ground (to either encourage settlements or litigate).  That said, I have had more than one mediator suggest that a client just pay the $75,000 deductible to settle because they will pay that much anyway if litigation proceeds.
  • Choice of Counsel: Many EPLI policies require certain law firms be used.  Others suggest that firms can be waived in.  Whether an off-panel firm to can waive in will depend on the insurance carrier.  Many times I have seen clients unable to get a desired firm approved.
  • Attorney Rates: Just about all carriers limit the rates that attorneys can charge.  But some also limit the rates that the client can pay.  Years ago it was typical for an employer to pay its law firm one rate, and then get partial reimbursement from the carrier for the approved (lower rate).  But now, many carriers prohibit that practice.
  • Is Wage/Hour Covered?: Typically wage-and-hour coverage is excluded unless a separate rider is purchased.  And that separate rider is very much like earthquake insurance in California with a relatively high cost, high deductible, and limited coverage.  Many wage-and-hour riders have a $100,000 or higher deductible (that only covers defense costs and not damages).  And often defense costs are capped at some amount after the deductible as well.  For example, a policy may only cover $100,000 in defense costs after a $100,000 deductible; so the only real coverage is on the second $100,000 in attorneys’ fees.
The time to think about these issues, and negotiate them (to the extent you can), is before you purchase or renew the policy, not after.  And while it isn’t fun to think about insurance, remember what my father said, it is important for those losses you simply can’t afford.