Tyreen Torner has again updated this Chart Summarizing CA State and Local Paid Sick Leave Rules. It summarizes the Paid Sick Leave laws for California, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Oakland, Berkeley, Santa Monica, and Emeryville.

Regular readers of this blog may be asking: “Wait. Didn’t she just do an update in June?” Yes, she did! But there have been changes since then in the rules for Santa Monica, San Francisco, and pesky little Emeryville. Keeping this chart current requires constant vigilance, but Tyreen is up to the task.

Tyreen Torner has again updated this Chart Summarizing CA State and Local Paid Sick Leave Rules. It summarizes the Paid Sick Leave laws for California, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Oakland, Berkeley, Santa Monica, and Emeryville.

Man lying with a broken leg in a cast on a sofaAre you curious about how the accrual cap rules in Oakland (where the Golden State Warriors are today celebrating their third NBA title in four years) compare to the accrual cap rules in Los Angeles (where the Lakers weren’t even the champions of LA)? Just look it up. It’s all there. Right at your fingertips. Thank you Tyreen!

We write a lot about minimum wages. That’s not because we’re unimaginative. We’re very imaginative. We can imagine things that you couldn’t even imag… But I digress.

Our own Tyreen Torner, who gave you a handy summary of all of California’s paid sick leave rules, has now created this chart summarizing all the minimum wages that apply in California for the next four years. How, you ask, can anyone put so much useful information on a single page? One word: Imagination!

Tyreen Torner has just updated this CA State & Local PSL Chart. It summarizes the Paid Sick Leave laws for California and the eight cities that have their own rules (LA, SF, San Diego, Oakland, Berkeley, Santa Monica, and Emeryville).

Have you ever wondered how the accrual cap rules in Santa Monica compare to the accrual cap rules in San Diego? Of course you have! Don’t be embarrassed. Are you curious about how the definition of sibling in San Francisco compares to the definition of sibling in San Diego? Just look it up. It’s all right there at your fingertips. All thanks to Tyreen!

It’s been barely two months since Tyreen Torner compiled a chart summarizing the paid sick leave laws of California and six cities (San Francisco, Oakland, Emeryville, Los Angeles, San Diego, and Santa Monica). Well, she has now updated the chart, which you can download here: CA State and City Paid Sick Leave Laws. Is Tyreen’s work done? Hardly! Berkeley has enacted its own paid sick leave laws that take effect in 2017. Other cities will also be jumping on the bandwagon and it will be time for another update. Sorry Tyreen!

Copyright: olivier26 / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: olivier26 / 123RF Stock Photo

Trying to keep track of all of California’s paid sick leave requirements is a daunting task. The state has its own rules and then so do seven municipalities, with Los Angeles joining the list July 1, 2016. Wouldn’t it be great if there was a single chart that contained all the requirements? Well now, thanks to Tyreen Torner, there is. Click on the link to download a PDF of the California Paid Sick Leave Rules Chart.

Copyright: olivier26 / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: olivier26 / 123RF Stock Photo

Are you curious about how the accrual cap rules in Oakland compare to the accrual cap rules in Santa Monica? Of course you are! Don’t be afraid to admit it. Are you wondering how the definition of sibling in San Francisco compares to the definition of sibling in San Diego? Just look it up. It’s all there. Right at your fingertips. Thank you Tyreen!

At this point, California has a statewide Paid Sick Leave Law and so do three cities: San Francisco, Oakland, and Emeryville. There are additional local ordinances that apply only to hotel workers, like Long Beach’s Measure N and Los Angeles’s Citywide Hotel Worker Minimum Wage Ordinance. But the state law and the municipal laws in SF, Oakland, and Emeryville apply to employees generally.

How do those laws compare? The answer’s complicated. But our own Tyreen Torner has created this handy chart comparing the laws on more than 20 25318124_sdifferent criteria. This is the same Tyreen Torner who drafted a summary of San Francisco’s various employment requirements. The comparison chart is a useful tool for anyone trying to comply with the competing requirements of these various jurisdictions. And it’s yours absolutely free!

The City of San Francisco is at it again. In addition to the already-mandated super-minimum wage, mandatory health insurance, and paid time off, Supervisor Erich Mar is now introducing the Retail Workers Bill of Rights to eliminate part-time and irregular schedules. He says in a San Francisco Chronicle editorial that the measure is needed to “protect the integrity of our neighborhoods.” The ordinance is backed by worker rights groups such as “Jobs With Justice” and “Young Workers United;” groups closely aligned with the city’s retail and hospitality unions. It would require that employers “offer additional hours to part-time employees before hiring more part-time employees”.

Thus, in a time of high unemployment, the City will be imposing a law that causes fewer jobs. According to Supervisor Mar, the measure “will create new protection for retail workers” who are currently “held hostage” by part-time schedules. This rhetoric, of course, ignores the fact that many employees (such as students, working mothers) prefer the flexibility of part-time schedules.

Worker rights groups and unions love these bills because part-time workers are more difficult to organize, and because imposing higher costs and less flexibility on non-union companies reduces competition for unionized firms. Mar admits that his ordinance is aimed at “our largest retail corporations like McDonald’s and Walmart” (read “non-union”). He says the measure is an “innovative way to address poverty and inequality,” but he offers little comfort to those displaced people who would have no job instead of a part-time job. Expect to see the Board of Supervisors voting on this proposed ordinance within the next few months.

For a comprehensive guide to San Franciso’s unique requirements for employers, check out this guide prepared by Tyreen Torner.

If you’ve been paying attention, you know that one of our recurring themes involves the challenges that California law imposes on employers. We’ve summarized the various California legal requirements in this guide (pdf).

But San Francisco employers have it worse. In addition to the rigorous and constantly shifting state law requirements, they also have to deal with onerous city requirements (including the highest minimum wage in the country – $10.55 per hour). There are also requirements for commuter benefits, per-employee spending on health care, a paid sick leave ordinance, and since January 1, 2014, we have our very own FFWO — that is, a Family Friendly Workplace Ordinance.

My colleague Tyreen Torner prepared and recently updated an excellent summary of these San Francisco requirements that you can find here (pdf). If you have employees in San Francisco, I’m sure you’ll find it useful. If not, don’t throw it in the trash. Along with everything else, San Francisco has the toughest mandatory composting and recycling law in the U.S.

The latest edition of the Preparing for Trial Action Guide is hot off the presses. Tyreen Torner and I wrote this latest edition. This is not a theoretical discussion. It provides practical step-by-step guidance on preparing a civil case for trial in California state court. We’d both like to thank the wonderful folks at Continuing Education of the Bar – California for their help with this project (especially Norma Piatt). You can order a copy here. Or, be the first one to e-mail me asking for a copy and I’ll send you one for free!

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