California Employment Law - A Fox Rothschild Blog

As the sun rises on New Year’s Day 2021, California employment law will once again become more involved and challenging. For many employers, the following are the top five developments they most need to prepare for.

  1. One Measure of Relief: COVID-19 Paid Sick Leave Requirements Expire

For much of 2020, California law has required that

As an unprecedented operation begins to deploy millions of doses of COVID-19 vaccines across the country, employers question whether they may lawfully require that employees be vaccinated. Today, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) weighed in with guidance.

The EEOC guidance makes points including the following:

  1. An employer (or a vendor contracted by the

How employers will need to defend California employment lawsuits, Labor Commissioner actions and even arbitrations must evolve come the New Year due to changes in the law that become effective January 1, 2021. In this post, I identify and explain five important developments that businesses and their employment defense counsel need to be aware of

[UPDATE: Guidance issued by the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing on these new requirements may be found here.

California employers with 100 or more employees are now required to file with the state detailed annual reports setting out demographic, pay and position information on their employees. As for the purpose of requiring

Employees who suffer physical or mental injury due to a crime will be entitled to job-protected leave and other protections from their employers under legislation signed this week by Governor Gavin Newsom. Employers will bear such obligations without confirmation from law enforcement that a crime occurred and where no one is arrested or prosecuted.

With so much going on for employers in 2020, let us not forget the #MeToo movement and related changes in California’s laws requiring sexual harassment prevention training.  All employers with more than five employees anywhere must train all California employees (managers/supervisors and staff) on sexual harassment prevention training before year end.

A while back, I

In meaningful numbers, employers across the U.S. who are rebuilding their workforces are being sued by employees not recalled from COVID furloughs and applicants not hired. Last week, I posted an Alert describing the risks to employers nationally of such litigation and giving recommendations on hiring up defensively. California employers, in particular, may be at

Widespread opioid abuse continues, including among working Americans, subjecting employers to the risk of liability under the intricacies of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and similar state laws. On Wednesday, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) weighed in, releasing two new guidance documents, one directed to employees and the other to their healthcare