As this pandemic began to take hold in the U.S., I was the one arguing “there is no way they will shut down all of California, it just isn’t practical!”  Nearly four months later, I stand corrected (with a mightily bruised ego).  With July 4th in our sights, COVID is accelerating across the country and

With restrictions beginning to soften following the months-long COVID-19 crisis, and producers eager to get back to production, but daunted by the economic and legal challenges of the pandemic production protocols, Fox Rothschild has launched a pro bono initiative to support financially impacted producers and production companies.  Earlier this week, a cross-country, collaborative team of

Governor Newsom announced today that California has moved on to early Stage 2, but only for cities and counties that obtain state approval.

Under Stage 2, certain businesses, establishments or activities may qualify to reopen including:

  • Dine-in restaurants
  • Limited services
  • Outdoor museums
  • Shopping centers & all in-store retail
  • All office-based workplaces
  • All manufacturing industries

Governor Gavin Newsom issued an executive order on May 6, 2020 that creates a rebuttable presumption that employees working outside the home who contract COVID-19 became infected at work. They would therefore be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits.

Here’s how the presumption works. An employee will be presumed to have contracted the virus at work

Following the April 7, 2020 Worker Protection Order issued by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors passed an Ordinance adding additional safeguards for workers (defined as an “employee or an independent contractor, that either physically works at a retail location that is open to the public and sells groceries,