Widespread opioid abuse continues, including among working Americans, subjecting employers to the risk of liability under the intricacies of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and similar state laws. On Wednesday, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) weighed in, releasing two new guidance documents, one directed to employees and the other to their healthcare

Faced with escalating Coronavirus infections in California, county public health departments across the state are ramping up enforcement of COVID-related restrictions on businesses — conducting investigations, imposing fines and shutting down non-compliant facilities.

Businesses at risk of enforcement action include those not adhering to mask, face shield, physical distancing and hygiene requirements for employees

On May 4, 2020, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti signed two new ordinances into law, affecting specified hotels and their restaurants, event centers, commercial properties, and airport services.  The Right of Recall Ordinance forces employers in these specified industries to rehire certain laid off workers, rather than allowing the rehire process to proceed at the

In response to the COVID-19 emergency and stay-at-home orders, Mayor Eric Garcetti signed two new ordinances into law.  Both ordinances will become effective on June 14, 2020.

The Right to Recall Ordinance dictates rehire protocol to select employers, providing guidelines based on seniority for select employers that laid off workers during the COVID-19 crisis.

The

Governor Gavin Newsom issued an executive order on May 6, 2020 that creates a rebuttable presumption that employees working outside the home who contract COVID-19 became infected at work. They would therefore be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits.

Here’s how the presumption works. An employee will be presumed to have contracted the virus at work

Following the April 7, 2020 Worker Protection Order issued by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors passed an Ordinance adding additional safeguards for workers (defined as an “employee or an independent contractor, that either physically works at a retail location that is open to the public and sells groceries,

Gig economy giants Uber and Postmates failed to convince U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee that she should grant an injunction to prevent enforcement of AB-5.  While seeking to halt enforcement of AB-5, the companies concurrently contend that the law does not apply to their drivers.  In case you’re just tuning in, AB-5 creates a legal

AB 51, which restricts workplace arbitration, was scheduled to take effect on January 1, 2020. On December 30, 2019, US District Judge Kimberly Mueller granted a temporary restraining order to prevent the legislation from taking effect.  On January 31, 2020, she issued a preliminary injunction extending the ban, and promised to explain her

AB 51, which restricts workplace arbitration, was scheduled to take effect on January 1, 2020. On December 30, 2019, US District Judge Kimberly Mueller granted a temporary restraining order to prevent the legislation from taking effect. She did so in response to a lawsuit by the California Chamber of Commerce and other employer groups arguing