Doing Business in California: A Guide for Employers

Anyone who pays attention can tell you that California employment law changes constantly. So we’re continually updating Doing Business in California: A Guide for Employers. This 15-page guide provides clear summaries of California’s unique requirements for employers. You can download a PDF of the Guide here. If you subscribe to that whole “ounce of prevention” theory, this is a great way to see if your company is complying with California’s overly complicated employment law requirements. On the other hand, if you’re more of the “ignorance is bliss” type, well, good luck in court.

Special thanks to Nancy Yaffe, Tyreen Torner, Sahara Pynes, and Cristina Armstrong for their work on earlier versions of this guide.

We recently updated a 15-page Employer’s Guide to Doing Business In California. The guide provides clear summaries of California’s unique requirements for meal and rest periods, the Fair Pay Act, paychecks and wage statements, the various leaves of absence, and more. If you subscribe to that whole “ounce of prevention” theory, this is a great way to see if your company is complying with California’s unique employment law requirements. You can download a pdf of the Guide here.

Spending a little time to determine if your company is sufficiently protected is a lot quicker and cheaper than waiting for a lawsuit and learning first hand why California ranks as the number one judicial hellhole.

Copyright: ibreaker213 / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: ibreaker213 / 123RF Stock Photo

Special thanks to Cristina ArmstrongTyreen Torner, and Sahara Pynes for their work updating prior versions of the guide.

Last week, I wrote about California reclaiming the top spot in a survey of judicial hellholes. You may be asking what makes California the worst of the worst.

According to the American Tort Reform Association, California’s biggest problem is the amount of new legislation coming out of Sacramento. We wrote about the major new employment laws for 2016 here. But those were just a fraction of the 808 bills that passed in the 2015 legislative session and were signed by the governor. ATRA explains:

That isn’t a misprint. A legislature hugely influenced by plaintiffs’ lawyers and checked only by an occasionally practical governor saw fit to create 808 new laws, many of which, by design, will lead to still more litigation and related costs that for many years have helped drive businesses, along with their jobs and tax revenues, out of the once Golden State and into the arms of less litigious jurisdictions around the country and across the globe.

There are, of course, benefits to living in a state that protects the rights of individuals. But there are also costs involved in having what Chief Executive Magazine annually declares to be “the worst state for business.”

Copyright: roxanabalint / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: roxanabalint / 123RF Stock Photo

Even the state’s biggest boosters have to acknowledge that businesses operating here face burdens that they face in no other state. We’ve prepared and recently updated a 15-page brochure that summarizes California’s unique employment law requirements. You can download it here.