Doing Business In California

Anyone who pays attention can tell you that California employment law changes constantly. So we’re continually updating Doing Business in California: A Guide for Employers. This 15-page guide provides clear summaries of California’s unique requirements for employers. You can download a PDF of the Guide here. If you subscribe to that whole “ounce of prevention” theory, this is a great way to see if your company is complying with California’s overly complicated employment law requirements. On the other hand, if you’re more of the “ignorance is bliss” type, well, good luck in court.

Special thanks to Nancy Yaffe, Tyreen Torner, Sahara Pynes, and Cristina Armstrong for their work on earlier versions of this guide.

We recently updated a 15-page Employer’s Guide to Doing Business In California. The guide provides clear summaries of California’s unique requirements for meal and rest periods, the Fair Pay Act, paychecks and wage statements, the various leaves of absence, and more. If you subscribe to that whole “ounce of prevention” theory, this is a great way to see if your company is complying with California’s unique employment law requirements. You can download a pdf of the Guide here.

Spending a little time to determine if your company is sufficiently protected is a lot quicker and cheaper than waiting for a lawsuit and learning first hand why California ranks as the number one judicial hellhole.

Copyright: ibreaker213 / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: ibreaker213 / 123RF Stock Photo

Special thanks to Cristina ArmstrongTyreen Torner, and Sahara Pynes for their work updating prior versions of the guide.

We recently updated a 15-page brochure that summarizes California’s unique employment law requirements. And it’s completely free. Not just free in terms of no cost, but also gluten free, which is a big deal here in the Golden State. Just download the PDF and it’s all yours.

Copyright: asiln / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: asiln / 123RF Stock Photo

The guide provides clear summaries of California’s unique requirements for meal and rest periods, the Fair Pay Act, paychecks and wage statements, the various leaves of absence, and more. Spending a little time to determine if your company is sufficiently protected is a lot quicker and cheaper than waiting for a lawsuit and learning first hand why California ranks as the number one judicial hellhole.

Special thanks to Sahara Pynes for her work updating this guide and to Cristina Armstrong and Tyreen Torner for their work on prior versions.

We recently updated a 15-page brochure that summarizes California’s unique employment law requirements. And it’s completely free. No postage and handling. No commitments to buy more. No need to provide your e-mail or credit card information. Just download the pdf and it’s all yours.

Copyright: drstokvektor / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: drstokvektor / 123RF Stock Photo

Spending a little time to determine if your company is sufficiently protected is a lot quicker and cheaper than waiting for a lawsuit, even if California has supposedly dropped to #2 on the list of judicial hellholes.

Special thanks to Tyreen Torner for her work updating this guide and Christina Armstrong for her work on prior versions.

We recently updated two publications that identify the employment law issues that get companies with California employees into the most trouble.  These pdf brochures — one for employers based outside California and one for those based in the state – summarize California’s unique legal requirements and how employers can protect themselves against serious legal exposure.

Spending a little time to determine if your company is sufficiently protected is a lot quicker and cheaper than waiting for a lawsuit — especially since you’re doing business in the #1 judicial hellhole.

Devil Child

I just updated two of our publications that identify the employment law issues that get employers operating in California into the most trouble.  These pdf brochures — one for employers based outside California and one for those based in the state — discuss California’s unique legal requirements and how employers can protect themselves against serious legal exposure.  I don’t want to resort to fear-mongering, but California employment law is scary stuff.  Is your company sufficiently protected?