My December routine is pretty predictable…sitting by the fire with my favorite holiday season beverage and my laptop fully charged to update employment handbooks and forms for the new year.  As an employment law policy and counseling specialist, I’m working on handbook number seven so far this month and thought I would share some of

As I have mentioned before, every California employer, large or small, needs three things: (1) an Employee Handbook that addresses California specific issues; (2) a comprehensive Confidentiality Agreement to protect the company’s proprietary information to the greatest extent possible; and (3) an Arbitration Agreement.

From time to time, I run across employers who never

There’s a sex harassment case playing out in federal court in New York – Marchuk v. Faruqi & Faruqi LLP –  that’s been getting a lot of attention. The allegations involve a law firm partner forcing himself on an associate after a holiday party. Law360 (subscription) provides daily updates. While there are enough sordid details

From the employer’s perspective, the only way to truly “win” an employment case is to avoid it in the first place. We litigators love the thrill of gettting a judge, arbitrator, or jury to decide in our client’s favor. But it can be awfully expensive to get to that point. So without further ado,

As the year end approaches it’s time to revisit your employee handbook and incorporate any updates reflecting changes in the law or your company’s practices.

At first, I thought this year only had a few minor handbook edits needed, including:

  • Add the word “stalking” to protections for domestic violence victims.
  • Expand the protections for victims