Guest Blog Post by Summer Associate Josie Lopez

As the millennial generation becomes the majority of the workforce, the composition of the workplace is changing significantly, and companies are starting to realize they are going to have to keep up with the times. Growing up in the age of social media, information and feedback have become instantaneous, and no one expects continuous feedback more than millennials. Not only do they expect it, they need it. That’s why so many companies are moving away from the annual employee review, and opting to get in touch with their employees more often. The Gap, for example, does monthly coaching sessions between employees and management—known internally as “GPS” (Grow, Perform, Succeed)—instead of annual reviews. These more frequent meetings allow managers to give better feedback with real examples and solutions that can be implemented immediately.

It’s also time to ditch the old-school rating systems. Asking managers to rate employees on a 1 to 5 scale focuses on what the employee has done wrong, instead of focusing on who the employee is and how they can improve. To get better insight into its employees, companies are now using multi-rater feedback systems, which gather the input of managers, peers, coworkers, and clients. These questionnaires are also getting a more holistic view of employees by asking more in-depth questions. For example, instead of asking whether Sam “exceeded expectations,” individuals are being asked to rate a statement like, “I can always go to Sam for creative input.”

As the workforce changes, so too must the workplace. As we pass the mid-point of 2018, now is the time to revamp your old-school performance reviews and adopt a more continuous system that gives millennial employees what they want and what they need to stay engaged and successful in the workplace.

A few days ago, many companies celebrated ‘Take Your Dog To Work Day’.  At an increasing number of companies, employees take their pets to work every day.  At other companies, in the ever-changing quest to be the cool kid on the block offering the latest and greatest benefits, the newest perk appears to be puppy playtime.  Google, Aetna and Intel are among the companies that have partnered with a non-profit that brings trained pets into the workplace to reduce employee stress levels for a few hours a week, while Amazon, Google, Ticketmaster, Etsy and Salesforce allow employees to bring their pets to work on a routine basis.

Photo credit: Bruin Suddleson

Pets in the workplace has been a hot topic in various forms for a few years. The issue of therapy or service dogs specifically garnered attention from the DFEH in its 2016 amended regulations requiring businesses to individually assess whether allowing a support animal at work is a reasonable accommodation for a disabled employee. The regulations define a “support animal” as “one that provides emotional, cognitive, or other similar support to a person with a disability, including, but not limited to, traumatic brain injuries or mental disabilities, such as major depression.” Anecdotally, we’ve also had an increase in hospitality clients who have questions about service dogs in restaurants and hotels. Given the media coverage and public trend of pet-friendly workplaces, businesses may face an uphill battle in establishing that allowing a support animal at work would be an undue hardship, which is the threshold for denying an accommodation. However, because I’m an employment lawyer, before opening your doggy doors to your employees’ four-legged friends, consider the arguments against a pet-friendly workplace which include potential liability for asthma-related disabilities, stress-related disabilities for those who may have a fear of pets, and even potential workers’ compensation claims for pet-related injuries. If you’re considering adopting a pet-friendly workplace culture, be sure to consider these risks and to implement thoughtful guidelines around the privilege to bring a pet to work, whether as an everyday occurrence or as a reasonable accommodation.