In 2009, a tragic accident occurred at a manufacturing plant in Orange County when a water heater exploded and killed two employees. The incident was duly investigated by Cal OSHA, and criminal charges were eventually brought against two individuals. Then the Orange County District Attorney decided to seek huge civil penalties against the employer under

The California Legislature has completed its work for this session, and three bills concerning employment issues survived the process and have been sent to Governor Brown for his consideration and possible signature. All three of these prospective laws have been labeled “job killers” by the California Chamber of Commerce which is lobbying heavily against

All of this news about hurricanes and the tragic images of people losing their homes (and everything in them), takes me back to advice my father gave me years ago, which was:  You need insurance for things you can’t afford to replace.

The same is true for businesses.  They need insurance for losses they

We’ve discussed before how phishing scams target employers. A new scam focuses on defendants who have settled class-action claims. The scammers send wire transfer instructions that appear to come from reputable class-action claims administrators. If the defendant wires the funds though, it eventually discovers that it is the victim of a spear phishing attack

We recently updated a 15-page Employer’s Guide to Doing Business In California. The guide provides clear summaries of California’s unique requirements for meal and rest periods, the Fair Pay Act, paychecks and wage statements, the various leaves of absence, and more. If you subscribe to that whole “ounce of prevention” theory, this is a great

Last Friday, the US Supreme Court agreed to hear cases from the 9th,  7th, and 5th Circuits in which the courts are split on the issue whether class action waivers in employee arbitration agreements violate Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act by inhibiting employees’ rights to engage in “concerted activity”.  The NLRB has

With briefs due next week, we anxiously await the California Supreme Court’s review of the de minimis doctrine.  Under the doctrine, employers are not obligated to pay employees for small increments of off-the-clock time spent preparing for or ending a shift, provided such time amounted to approximately 10 minutes or less of work.

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